Brain: A Journal of Neurology - Journal - MOST Wiedzy

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Brain: A Journal of Neurology

ISSN:

0006-8950

eISSN:

1460-2156

Disciplines
(Field of Science):

  • Biomedical engineering (Engineering and Technology)
  • Pharmacology and pharmacy (Medical and Health Sciences )
  • Medical sciences (Medical and Health Sciences )
  • Physical culture science (Medical and Health Sciences )
  • Health sciences (Medical and Health Sciences )
  • Biological sciences (Natural sciences)

Ministry points: Help

Ministry points - current year
Year Points List
2021 200 Ministry Scored Journals List 2019
Ministry points - previous years
Year Points List
2021 200 Ministry Scored Journals List 2019
2020 200 Ministry Scored Journals List 2019
2019 200 Ministry Scored Journals List 2019
2018 50 A
2017 50 A
2016 45 A
2015 45 A
2014 50 A
2013 50 A
2012 50 A
2011 50 A
2010 32 A
2009 32 A
2008 32 A

Model:

Hybrid

Points CiteScore:

Points CiteScore - current year
Year Points
2019 17.4
Points CiteScore - previous years
Year Points
2019 17.4
2018 17.6
2017 18.4
2016 18
2015 18
2014 18.1
2013 18.3
2012 17.7
2011 16.8

Impact Factor:

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Filters

total: 4

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  • Year

Catalog Journals

2018
  • Human memory enhancement through electrical stimulation in the temporal cortex
    Publication
    • M. Kucewicz
    • B. Berry
    • L. Miller
    • F. Khadjevand
    • Y. Ezzyat
    • J. Stein
    • V. Kremen
    • B. Brinkmann
    • P. Wanda
    • M. Sperling... and 10 others

    - Brain: A Journal of Neurology - 2018

    Direct electrical stimulation of the human brain can elicit sensory and motor perceptions as well as recall of memories. Stimulating higher order association areas of the lateral temporal cortex in particular was reported to activate visual and auditory memory representations of past experiences (Penfield and Perot, 1963). We hypothesized that this effect could be used to modulate memory processing. Recent attempts at memory enhancement...

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2017
  • Dissecting gamma frequency activities during human memory processing
    Publication
    • M. Kucewicz
    • B. Berry
    • V. Kremen
    • B. Brinkmann
    • M. Sperling
    • B. Jobst
    • R. Gross
    • B. Lega
    • S. Sheth
    • J. Stein... and 6 others

    - Brain: A Journal of Neurology - 2017

    Gamma frequency activity (30-150 Hz) is induced in cognitive tasks and is thought to reflect underlying neural processes. Gamma frequency activity can be recorded directly from the human brain using intracranial electrodes implanted in patients undergoing treatment for drug-resistant epilepsy. Previous studies have independently explored narrowband oscillations in the local field potential and broadband power increases. It is not...

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2014
  • High frequency oscillations are associated with cognitive processing in human recognition memory
    Publication
    • M. Kucewicz
    • J. Cymbalnik
    • J. Matsumoto
    • B. Brinkmann
    • M. Bower
    • V. Vasoli
    • V. Sulc
    • F. Meyer
    • W. Marsh
    • S. Stead
    • G. Worrell

    - Brain: A Journal of Neurology - 2014

    High frequency oscillations are associated with normal brain function, but also increasingly recognized as potential biomarkers of the epileptogenic brain. Their role in human cognition has been predominantly studied in classical gamma frequencies (30-100 Hz), which reflect neuronal network coordination involved in attention, learning and memory. Invasive brain recordings in animals and humans demonstrate that physiological oscillations...

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2013
  • Network oscillations modulate interictal epileptiform spike rate during human memory
    Publication
    • J. Matsumoto
    • M. Stead
    • M. Kucewicz
    • A. Matsumoto
    • P. Peters
    • B. Brinkmann
    • J. Danstrom
    • S. Goerss
    • W. Marsh
    • F. Meyer
    • G. Worrell

    - Brain: A Journal of Neurology - 2013

    Eleven patients being evaluated with intracranial electroencephalography for medically resistant temporal lobe epilepsy participated in a visual recognition memory task. Interictal epileptiform spikes were manually marked and their rate of occurrence compared between baseline and three 2 s periods spanning a 6 s viewing period. During successful, but not unsuccessful, encoding of the images there was a significant reduction in...

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