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Abdominal epilepsy in patient of schizophrenia - a diagnostic dilemma

Abstract

Abdominal epilepsy is a rare and uncomman cause of recurrent abdominal pain. It is commonly occuring in children, but rarely in adolescent and elderly. Paroxysmal episodes of abdominal pain with neurological symptoms like dizziness, lethargy, and abnormal electroencephalogram and remarkable response to anticonvulsant confirms the diagnosis. Here we present a case of schizophrenia, who has repoted with recurrent abdominal pain for 6 months, and she responded with valproic acid, and remained symptoms freee.

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Title of issue:
Düşünen Adam: The Journal of Psychiatry and Neurological Sciences strony 216 - 218
Publication year:
2021
Bibliographic description:
Abdominal epilepsy is a rare and uncommon cause of recurrent abdominal pain. It is commonly occurring in children, but rarely in adolescents and elderly. Paroxysmal episodes of abdominal pain with neurological symptoms like dizziness, lethargy, and abnormal electroencephalogram and remarkable response to anticonvulsants confirms the diagnosis. Here we present a case of schizophrenia, who has reported with recurrent abdominal pain for 6 months, and she responded with valproic acid and remained symptoms free.
DOI:
Digital Object Identifier (open in new tab) doi: 10.14744/dajpns.2021.00140
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  12. Data analysis/Interpretation F.R.I.A., S.F.Q. open in new tab
  13. Case follow-up (if applicable) S.F.Q., J.A.S. open in new tab
  14. Category 2 Drafting manuscript J.A.S., S.F.Q. open in new tab
  15. Critical revision of manuscript Y.B.A.S., F.R.I.A. Category 3 Final approval and accountability F.R.I.A., Y.B.A.S. Other Technical or material support J.A.S., S.F.Q. open in new tab
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