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Widespread theta synchrony and high-frequency desynchronization underlies enhanced cognition

Abstract

The idea that synchronous neural activity underlies cognition has driven an extensive body of research in human and animal neuroscience. Yet, insufficient data on intracranial electrical connectivity has precluded a direct test of this hypothesis in a whole-brain setting. Through the lens of memory encoding and retrieval processes, we construct whole-brain connectivity maps of fast gamma (30-100 Hz) and slow theta (3-8 Hz) spectral neural activity, based on data from 294 neurosurgical patients fitted with indwelling electrodes. Here we report that gamma networks desynchronize and theta networks synchronize during encoding and retrieval. Furthermore, for nearly all brain regions we studied, gamma power rises as that region desynchronizes with gamma activity elsewhere in the brain, establishing gamma as a largely asynchronous phenomenon. The abundant phenomenon of theta synchrony is positively correlated with a brain region's gamma power, suggesting a predominant low-frequency mechanism for inter-regional communication.

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Authors (15)

  • Photo of  E.a. Solomon

    E.a. Solomon

    • University of Pennsylvania Department of Bioengineering
  • Photo of  J.e. Kragiel

    J.e. Kragiel

    • University of Pennsylvania Department of Psychology
  • Photo of  Michael R. Sperling

    Michael R. Sperling

    • Thomas Jefferson University Hospital Department of Neurology
  • Photo of  Ashwini Sharan

    Ashwini Sharan

    • Thomas Jefferson University Hospital Department of Neurosurgery
  • Photo of  Gregory Worrell

    Gregory Worrell

    • Mayo Clinic Department of Neurology
  • Photo of dr Michał Tomasz Kucewicz

    Michał Tomasz Kucewicz dr

    • Mayo Clinic Department of Neurology
  • Photo of  Cory S. Inman

    Cory S. Inman

    • Emory School of Medicine Department of Neurosurgery
  • Photo of  Bradley Lega

    Bradley Lega

    • University of Texas Southwestern Department of Neurosurgery
  • Photo of  Kathryn A. Davis

    Kathryn A. Davis

    • Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania Department of Neurology
  • Photo of  Joel M. Stein

    Joel M. Stein

    • Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania Department of Radiology
  • Photo of  Barbara C. Jobst

    Barbara C. Jobst

    • Dartmouth Medical Center Department of Neurology
  • Photo of  Kareem Zaghloul

    Kareem Zaghloul

    • National Institutes of Health Surgical Neurology Branch
  • Photo of  Sameer A. Sheth

    Sameer A. Sheth

    • Columbia University Medical Center Department of Neurosurgery
  • Photo of  Daniel S. Rizzuto

    Daniel S. Rizzuto

    • University of Pennsylvania Department of Psychology
  • Photo of  Michael J. Kahana

    Michael J. Kahana

    • University of Pennsylvania Department of Psychology

Details

Category:
Articles
Type:
artykuł w czasopiśmie wyróżnionym w JCR
Published in:
Nature Communications no. 8, edition 1,
ISSN: 2041-1723
Language:
English
Publication year:
2017
Bibliographic description:
Solomon E., Kragiel J., Sperling M., Sharan A., Worrell G., Kucewicz M., Inman C., Lega B., Davis K., Stein J., Jobst B., Zaghloul K., Sheth S., Rizzuto D., Kahana M.: Widespread theta synchrony and high-frequency desynchronization underlies enhanced cognition// Nature Communications. -Vol. 8, iss. 1 (2017), s.-
DOI:
Digital Object Identifier (open in new tab) 10.1038/s41467-017-01763-2
Verified by:
Gdańsk University of Technology

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